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ekunitz
24.04.2006, 14:04
Hello!

I've been snooping around on this forum for the past while, as I've become fairly interested in making my own stuff for the past while. I am Canadian, but live in Germany now- this forum has really helped me out, in terms of where to look for materials as well as giving me a much broader look at German lightweight hiking. Now is question time...

I want to put together a very simple summer weight to use in my hammock. I have a Deuter hut bag that I want to butcher, but I want to add some insulation to it as well. Unfortunatly, I can't find anything in europe that is comperable to Polaguard of Primaloft. What have you all been using for you MYOG insulated projects? I see thinsulate everywhere, but I'm not sure that this will work for me (pretty heavy stuff, but it might work for a simple summer quilt). Any suggestions?

ekunitz

p.s.- Deutsch replies are more than welcome. I can read it well, aber zum schreiben habe ich noch grosse probleme!

Christian Wagner
24.04.2006, 19:37
Hey Everett, glad you made it to this board....ggg.
Hows the backpack goin'?

Concerning theinsulation I got no useful answer whatsoever.

Only know of some US- based stores that sell the good stuff (Primaloft/Polarguard). Noone in Europe that I know of has something else in stock that's not Thinsulate- Bummer.

I'd apreciate any info on a good EU based source for the better insulation as well.

BTW- I just tried out a nice syntheti fil sweater that I made a couple of months ago- I used a worn out sleepingbag of mine. The fil is Thinsulate liteloft. A good insulation at the beginning but it wears down quick. I used some relatively undamaged parts of the sleepingbag and got away with a pretty nice piece of warm clothing, but it weights in at 400 gr- too much for my SUL- gearlist (or maybe not? :lol: )

PS: Nay, I won't write in german- gotta practice ;)

ekunitz
24.04.2006, 23:50
Christian,

The pack is turning out okay, considering its my first attempt. All the materials were scavenged from old stuff sacks and other packs so it looks pretty scary (that could be seen as cool). I've just given it to a schneiderine buddy of mine to double up with a machine on all of the stitching (previously done by me, by hand).

I've also got an old Hollofill bag, but I'm a little bit hesitant to open it up. It's my only cold weather bag, and I think it might even be just one single super thick layer which would be a mess to separate into thinner insulation. Or maybe I could just open it up and take a peak...

But wait, I still need to know what will happen if I use normal Thinsulate for a quilt. I haven't heard of anybody doing it before, and there must be a good reason for that. I was thinking of using a single layer the 116g/m2 stuff from Extrem Textil. I seem to remeber reading that Thinsulate has the same insulative properties as other insulations for half the loft, so 1.2cm should be like using 2.8 cm (an inch and a bit) of normal insulation. My other option would be to use fleece(did I mention I live in Goerlitz?), but that would double the weight and possibly volume. Something I'm definatly trying to avoid.

Where did you get your down for the quilt project on your website? How much did the whole thing cost?

ekunitz

Christian Wagner
25.04.2006, 00:43
The pack is turning out okay, considering its my first attempt. All the materials were scavenged from old stuff sacks and other packs so it looks pretty scary (that could be seen as cool). I've just given it to a schneiderine buddy of mine to double up with a machine on all of the stitching (previously done by me, by hand). By hand- you are nuts :wink: . You probably might want to borrow a sewing machine from your neighbour (or buy one from a local goodwill store (Ebay is often too expensive.)).

I've also got an old Hollofill bag, but I'm a little bit hesitant to open it up. It's my only cold weather bag, and I think it might even be just one single super thick layer which would be a mess to separate into thinner insulation. Or maybe I could just open it up and take a peak... I wouldn't cut up a serviceable piece of equipment. Hollofil is too old scholl anyway- there is better stuff out there- I wouldn't put my time and labour into inferior material. Been there done that and it just didn't pay off because I wanted to build a "better" version soon.
But wait, I still need to know what will happen if I use normal Thinsulate for a quilt. I haven't heard of anybody doing it before, and there must be a good reason for that. I was thinking of using a single layer the 116g/m2 stuff from Extrem Textil. I seem to remeber reading that Thinsulate has the same insulative properties as other insulations for half the loft, so 1.2cm should be like using 2.8 cm (an inch and a bit) of normal insulation. My other option would be to use fleece(did I mention I live in Goerlitz?), but that would double the weight and possibly volume. Something I'm definatly trying to avoid. I heard the claims of thinsulate as well and I don't give a damn. Why not use primaloft from thru-hiker.com or other sources?

Fleece has by far the worst loft to weight ratio- bulky when packed as well.

Is Polartec at Görlitz still up and running? I heard the went bankrupt.

ekunitz
25.04.2006, 01:25
Yup, all those were pretty bad ideas. Tschja, geld sparen versuchen=not so great homemade kit.

How long will an order from Thru-hiker take if anybody here has done that before?

The fleece fabric is finished here, or as far as Malden Mills is concerened. They have been searching for a new contractor or buyer, but no takers. I picked up a ton of stuff at silly prices before they closed out, now I dont know what to do with it.

hikingharry
25.04.2006, 03:39
The one time I bought some stuff at Thru-hiker.com it came within 10 days. I was very surprised, because of the fast service. I live in Austria and sometimes I had to wait the same time for an order from Globetrotter.de

Gruß hikingharry

david0815
09.05.2006, 17:27
hello,

back in action after a longer time of absence.

Why not to use some Sonofil (Polyesterflauschvlies) normally used to damp HiFi-Speakers. Just an untried idea.

greetings David

felö
10.05.2006, 12:28
@ hikingharry: habe auf der homepage von thru hiker leider keine Versandgebühren gefunden, was hast Du bezahlt? (inkl. Zoll, usw.)

Danke und Gruß

Felö

hikingharry
10.05.2006, 13:07
Hi Felö,

ich kann mich nicht mehr so erinnern, aber das war auch schon 2002 im Dezember, glaube ich. Die Rechnung und das Ganze finde ich nicht mehr.

Damals war das Silnylon noch billiger.

Jedenfalls jetzt komme ich bei 19 yd. Silnylon auf 113,05 $ US + Versand 36,90 $ US. = > 118 EUR. Das findest Du raus, wenn Du die Bestellung fast fertig machst.

Dazu dann Mwst. und davon wird der Zoll berechnet. Ich wollte damals einfach den Stoff haben, und das war die billigste Quelle. Aber ich denke alles zusammen war es ungefähr 40% Mehrkosten als Material- und Versandkosten.

Tut mir leid, das ich Dir da nicht mehr helfen kann.

Gruß hikingharry

PS: Das wären ca. 9 EUR der yard.

ekunitz
10.05.2006, 17:17
hello,

back in action after a longer time of absence.

Why not to use some Sonofil (Polyesterflauschvlies) normally used to damp HiFi-Speakers. Just an untried idea.

greetings David

I just googled sonofil. This stuff is for speaker boxes? Na jah, it comes in sheets of 100cm/40cm/4cm. David, if you have any idea, what does it weigh? Has anybody else ever tried using this as a thermal insulator?

ekunitz

p.s.- Christian: I finally finished up my pack. I took some ideas from your website, some ideas from an old klettersac I had, and I made a hip belt a la LAB. Whole thing weighs around 600 grams on my less than accurate kitchen scale- not bad for a pack made from 100% "found" materials.